COT Report: USD Index, Euro, Bitcoin Speculator bets fall. Crude, Gold & Mexican Peso bets gain

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The CFTC put out their latest Commitment of Traders data release on Friday for data that is updated through February 19th. The releases were delayed for over a month due to the government shutdown and are being released twice a week to catch up to current data.

Here are this week’s links to the latest Commitment of Traders data changes that were released on Friday.

  • USD Index Speculators reduced their bullish bets. Euro bets drop, MXN bets up
  • WTI Crude OilSpeculators bullish bets rebounded in mid-February
  • 10-Year Note Speculators raised bearish bets for 4th straight week
  • Gold Speculators pushed bullish bets to highest since April 2018 in mid-February
  • Bitcoin Speculators raised their bearish bets for 3rd week. Commercials go bullish
  • S&P500 Mini Speculators continued to raise their bearish bets in mid-February
  • Silver Speculators trimmed bullish bets off of highest level since Nov. 2017 for 2nd week
  • Copper Speculators edged their bullish bets lower in middle of February

USD Index Speculators reduced their bullish bets. Euro bets drop, MXN bets up

Large currency speculators decreased their net positions in the US Dollar Index futures markets, according to the latest Commitment of Traders (COT) data released by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) on Friday. See full article.


WTI Crude Oil Speculators bullish bets rebounded in mid-February

The large speculator contracts of WTI crude futures totaled a net position of 313,967 contracts, according to the latest data. This was a change of 25,753 contracts from the previous weekly total. See full article.


10-Year Note Speculators raised bearish bets for 4th straight week

Large speculator contracts of the 10-Year Bond futures totaled a net position of -215,091 contracts, according to the latest data this week. This was a change of -49,602 contracts from the previous weekly total. See full article.


Gold Speculators pushed bullish bets to highest since April 2018 in mid-February

Large precious metals speculator contracts of the Gold futures totaled a net position of 145,647 contracts, according to the latest data this week. This was a change of 40,773 contracts from the previous weekly total. See full article.


Bitcoin Speculators raised their bearish bets for 3rd week. Commercials go bullish

Cryptocurrency speculator contracts of the Bitcoin futures totaled a net position of -1,439 contracts, according to the latest data this week. This was a change of -210 contracts from the previous weekly total. See full article.


S&P500 Mini Speculators continued to raise their bearish bets in mid-February

Large stock market speculator contracts of the S&P500 mini futures totaled a net position of -130,834 contracts, according to the latest data this week. This was a change of -11,329 contracts from the previous weekly total. See full article.


Silver Speculators trimmed bullish bets off of highest level since Nov. 2017 for 2nd week

Large precious metals speculator contracts of the silver futures totaled a net position of 50,269 contracts, according to the latest data this week. This was a change of -2,934 contracts from the previous weekly total. See full article.


Copper Speculators edged their bullish bets lower in middle of February

Metals speculator contracts of the copper futures totaled a net position of 878 contracts, according to the latest data this week. This was a change of -325 contracts from the previous weekly total. See full article.


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*COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) were positioned in the futures markets.

The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators).

Find CFTC criteria here: (http://www.cftc.gov/MarketReports/CommitmentsofTraders/ExplanatoryNotes/index.htm).

USD Index Speculators reduced their bullish bets. Euro bets drop, MXN bets up

March 2nd – By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

US Dollar Index Speculator Positions

Large currency speculators cut back on their bullish net positions in the US Dollar Index futures markets through mid-February, according to the latest Commitment of Traders (COT) data released by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) on Friday.

This latest COT data is from the middle of February due to the government shutdown which suspended the releases for approximately a month. The CFTC is releasing data on Tuesdays and Fridays going forward until the data is back up to date.

The non-commercial futures contracts of US Dollar Index futures, traded by large speculators and hedge funds, totaled a net position of 32,839 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday February 19th. This was a weekly reduction of -446 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 33,285 net contracts.

The net position was the result of the gross bullish position gaining by 1,898 contracts to a weekly total of 48,544 contracts compared to the gross bearish position total of 15,705 contracts which saw a lift by 2,344 contracts for the week.



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The speculative US dollar index positioning dipped for the fourth time in the previous five weeks through February 19th. The standing for USD index spec positions remained strong and above the +30,000 contract level for a twenty-ninth straight week.


Individual Currencies Data this week:

In the other major currency contracts data, we saw two substantial changes (+ or – 10,000 contracts) in the speculators category this week.

Euro bets dropped through Feb. 19th by over -11,000 contract. This was a fifth straight week of declining bets with positions falling by a total of -42,273 contracts over that period. The euro standing declined to the most bearish level since December 20th of 2016.

Mexican peso bets jumped by over +18,000 contracts on February 19th and rose for a ninth consecutive week (a gain of 95,864 contracts in that period). The peso positioning advanced to the best level since April of 2017 when the net position topped out above the +100,000 contract level.

Overall, the major currencies that saw improving speculator positions through February 19th were the Canadian dollar (1,100 weekly change in contracts), New Zealand dollar (383 contracts) and the Mexican peso (18,684 contracts).

The currencies whose speculative bets declined on the week were the US dollar index (-446 weekly change in contracts), euro (-11,034 weekly change in contracts), British pound sterling (-4,584 contracts), Japanese yen (-6,719 contracts), Swiss franc (-2,670 contracts) and the Australian dollar (-2,573 contracts).

See the table and individual currency charts below.


Table of Large Speculator Levels & Weekly Changes:

 

This latest COT data is through Tuesday and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) were positioned in the futures markets. All currency positions are in direct relation to the US dollar where, for example, a bet for the euro is a bet that the euro will rise versus the dollar while a bet against the euro will be a bet that the dollar will gain versus the euro.

 


Weekly Charts: Large Trader Weekly Positions vs Price

EuroFX:

The Euro large speculator standing this week totaled a net position of -74,934 contracts in the latest data reported. This was a weekly decrease of -11,034 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -63,900 net contracts.


British Pound Sterling:

The large British pound sterling speculator level recorded a net position of -47,528 contracts in the data reported for February 19th. This was a weekly fall of -4,584 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -42,944 net contracts.


Japanese Yen:

Large Japanese yen speculators was a net position of -37,461 contracts in the latest data. This was a weekly decline of -6,719 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -30,742 net contracts.


Swiss Franc:

The Swiss franc speculator standing this week totaled a net position of -23,350 contracts in the data through February 19th. This was a weekly decrease of -2,670 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -20,680 net contracts.


Canadian Dollar:

Canadian dollar speculators was a net position of -36,437 contracts. This was a lift of 1,100 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -37,537 net contracts.


Australian Dollar:

The large speculator positions in Australian dollar futures reached a net position of -37,068 contracts this week in the data ending Tuesday February 19th. This was a weekly decline of -2,573 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -34,495 net contracts.


New Zealand Dollar:

The New Zealand dollar speculative standing came in at a net position of -740 contracts this week in the latest COT data. This was a weekly advance of 383 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -1,123 net contracts.


Mexican Peso:

Mexican peso speculators totaled a net position of 95,095 contracts for February 19th. This was a weekly lift of 18,684 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 76,411 net contracts.


Article By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

*COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) were positioned in the futures markets.

The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators).

Find CFTC criteria here: (http://www.cftc.gov/MarketReports/CommitmentsofTraders/ExplanatoryNotes/index.htm).

Hail the ‘O.G.’ Uber and Lyft drivers in line to cash in on the highly an…









At Lyft Inc., they were called “the O.G.”

This iteration of an original gang comprised the first 50 or so drivers who took a chance on what may then have sounded like a crazy concept.

Now, as Lyft and rival Uber Technologies Inc. gear up for the transition from startup to public company, both are considering giving some of their loyal drivers a chance to buy stock in their initial public offerings, the Wall Street Journal has reported.

Lyft filed its prospectus for an initial public offering on Friday. Both companies have revealed that they plan to go public this year.

In San Francisco, the drivers who helped build these ride-sharing empires include a former personal caregiver, a former security guard and a former Credit Suisse investment banker.

See also: Lyft IPO: 5 things the ride-hailing company just revealed

The companies haven’t said how they’d select the lucky drivers, but they likely would focus on longtime, active drivers, and, at Lyft, the plan is to award drivers who have logged at least 10,000 rides, according to the report. Lyft and Uber have not responded to MarketWatch requests for comment.

Carlo Garibay was a private caregiver in Silicon Valley in 2012 when he first heard of Lyft. He had a 2-year-old son and figured he could use the flexible hours. At the time, there were no more than 20 employees at Lyft, and co-founders Logan Green and John Zimmer interviewed potential drivers, Garibay said.

“Zimmer interviewed me,” Garibay said. “At first I thought it was very sketchy, because I found the ad on Craigslist, and it said something like ‘control your hours and get paid every week,’ ” said Garibay, who lives in Hercules, Calif., with his wife and now two children and drives a hybrid 2019 Acura MDX.

The driver estimates he has given more than 20,000 Lyft and Uber rides (he started driving for Uber, too, in 2013). If given a chance, he would hold on to his shares, rather than cash them out, he said. “I’d have the shares for both companies as a security blanket long term,” he said. “Cash on hand is easy to spend.”

Related: Tesla finally launches $35,000 Model 3, and moves all sales online

Deco Carter was a security guard in the Mission District in San Francisco in 2013 when he decided on a career change. A friend had told him about Lyft.

“I had never heard of a startup before,” Carter said. “At the time, it wasn’t a term you heard very much.” He donned a suit for his interview, only to arrive at a small office that Lyft shared with another startup and notice that everyone was dressed in jeans and T-shirts.

“I didn’t know if that was a company, or just some people trying to get something going,” Carter said. “I was like, what’s going on?” He and other candidates “were looking at each other, saying, ‘Have you heard of this?’ ”

The company gave him a giant pink mustache — Lyft’s symbol at the time — along with a bag of candy for passengers and a phone charger, said Carter, a San Francisco resident who is regularly called a “Lyft legend” by fellow drivers and drives a hip-hop-themed 2006 Toyota Scion XB for Lyft and Lyft alone.

“I’d definitely go for the shares, if I had that choice, [and] put it away for the kids,” Carter said. It’s paycheck-to-paycheck for his family, and Carter does not have much experience or interest in the stock market. “That’s not my area at all.”

His wheelhouse, he said, is creating a “fun learning atmosphere” about hip hop for his passengers to enjoy on his rides.

Keith Maddock, a self-described “car guy to the core,” started driving for Lyft, and shortly after for Uber, in 2013.

He had worked for Credit Suisse














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in San Francisco, and enjoyed the technical aspects of his investment-banking job but past his associate years was finding the sales role was not something he’d enjoy long term. He left his job of four years “with a nice little buffer.”

“After two weeks of watching Netflix, I was bored, and thinking I’ve got to do something,” he said. “I thought, why not do the pink-mustache thing, for at least a few weeks, meet people he would never meet otherwise, make some beer money and drive cars.

At his most active, he drove 80 hours a week. “It was a lot of hustle,” he said.

Maddock, who lives in San Francisco, still uses the Lyft and Uber apps occasionally, but mostly to fill the gaps in his own limousine service, he said.

“It’s going to be a safe bet,” he said of the IPOs. Even if a driver needs the money immediately, they could hold on to half of it for a few weeks or months, sell it at a profit, and keep the other half as a long-term investment, Maddock said.

Access to the IPOs for drivers would be huge — a way to get in on a hot new stock-market issue without having to be “a friend of Frank,” Maddock said, alluding to Frank Quattrone, the prominent Silicon Valley banker who took public Amazon.com Inc.














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, Cisco Systems Inc.














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and other heavyweights in the 1990s tech boom. Quattrone was sidelined by a conviction for obstruction of justice, later overturned, in connection with an investigation into how Credit Suisse First Boston allocated IPO shares.

With so many drivers, the amount they can earn has dwindled. The hours can still be grueling. But all three men said they appreciated what Lyft and Uber may do for some of them.

“It’s appreciation for people like me who put the company on the map,” Carter, the former security guard, said. “We made this company.”



























Claudia Assis is a San Francisco-based reporter for MarketWatch. Follow her on Twitter @ClaudiaAssisMW.


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Economic Preview: All the bad news on the economy can’t overshadow where …










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The economy is not growing as fast as it was last year, but a strong labor market means the good times aren’t likely to end anytime soon.

Forget a seemingly miserable December for the U.S. economy or the dreary start in 2019: What really matters is whether businesses are still hiring — and they are.

By some measures the economy appears crummy. Retail sales and consumer spending nosedived in December — the decline in spending was the biggest since 2009 — and large swathes of the economy have begun to flag.

Opinion: How the Republicans moved the goal post on GDP

The housing market was crunched by rising mortgage rates at year end, for example, and manufacturers grew in February at the slowest pace since Donald Trump was elected in 2016.

Just some stray flotsam and jetsam?

Uh-uh. The economy has indeed shifted into a lower gear. Many economists predict 1% GDP growth or less in the first quarter.

“The bottom line is that growth has now been slowing for the past few quarters,” said chief U.S. economist Paul Ashworth of Capital Economics.

Yet some of the more negative readings on the economy are probably exaggerated, a residue of the partial 35-day government shutdown in December and January that mucked up the government’s ability to monitor what was going on.

The Federal Reserve, for its part, recently gave a big assist to the economy by announcing that further increases in U.S. interest rates are on hold. The decision fueled a huge stock














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 rally and is likely to stoke home sales via lower mortgage rates.

And the one thing that counts more than any other — the labor market — is still going strong.

Read: Economy slows to 2.6% in fourth quarter, GDP shows, but it still shows lots of muscle

The economy has added 1 million new jobs since October, capped off by a frothy 304,000 increase in January.

The unemployment rate has increased slightly to 4% from a 49-year low of 3.7% late last year, but it’s rising for the right reason. More Americans are entering the labor force in search of work with job openings at an all-time high.

The pace of hiring in February, which the government reports Friday, is unlikely to match the big tab in January. The last time the U.S. posted back-to-back gains of 300,000 new jobs was in 2006. Winter weather is also a wild card early in the year.

Still, economists polled by MarketWatch think the economy will probably show another healthy increase in hiring of around 180,000 . The jobless rate is expected to stay or 4% or even fall to 3.9%.

See: MarketWatch Economic Calendar

That’s what counts most. The U.S. economy is largely driven by how much consumers spend — and consumers spend when they have secure jobs.

Even better, incomes and wages are growing at the fastest pace since the end of the 2007-2009 recession, while a broad decline in inflation has lifted the buying power of households.

If the labor market does start to falter, the first signs will show up in how many people apply for unemployment benefits each week. The latest snapshot comes a day before the U.S. jobs report.

So-called initial jobless claims, a rough measure of layoffs, are still near a 50-year low, but they no longer appear to be in decline. Indeed, they’ve risen slightly compared to last fall.

Another thing to watch is job openings. They surged to a record 7.3 million at the end of 2018 and now easily exceed the number of Americans officially classified as unemployed.

Some drop-off would not be surprising in January, but Wall Street will pay close attention for signs of major erosion in the labor market.



























Jeffry Bartash is a reporter for MarketWatch in Washington.


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WTI Crude Oil Speculators bullish bets rebounded in mid-February

March 2nd – By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

WTI Crude Oil Non-Commercial Speculator Positions:

Large energy speculators advanced their bullish net positions in the WTI Crude Oil futures markets in February, according to the latest Commitment of Traders (COT) data released by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) on Friday.

This latest COT data is from the middle of February due to the government shutdown which suspended the releases for approximately a month. The CFTC is releasing data on Tuesdays and Fridays going forward until the data is back up to date.

The non-commercial futures contracts of WTI Crude Oil futures, traded by large speculators and hedge funds, totaled a net position of 313,967 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday February 19th. This was a gain of 25,753 net contracts from the previous week which had a total of 288,214 net contracts.



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The week’s net position was the result of the gross bullish position (longs) ascending by 6,819 contracts to a weekly total of 479,000 contracts compared to the gross bearish position (shorts) which saw a decline by -18,934 contracts for the week to a total of 165,033 contracts.

Speculative crude oil bets had fallen for two straight weeks before the February 19th turnaround and brought the net bullish standing back over the +300,000 contract level. Over the past year, speculative positions peaked on January 30, 2018 with a total net position of 739,097 contracts before slowly seeing a paring of bets that have brought the current levels to under half of that total.

WTI Crude Oil Commercial Positions:

The commercial traders position, hedgers or traders engaged in buying and selling for business purposes, totaled a net position of -322,423 contracts on the week. This was a weekly fall of -23,495 contracts from the total net of -298,928 contracts reported the previous week.

WTI Crude Oil Futures:

Over the same weekly reporting time-frame, from Tuesday to Tuesday, the WTI Crude Oil Futures (Front Month) closed at approximately $56.45 which was a rise of $3.35 from the previous close of $53.10, according to unofficial market data.

*COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) as well as the commercial traders (hedgers & traders for business purposes) were positioned in the futures markets.

The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators).

Find CFTC criteria here: (http://www.cftc.gov/MarketReports/CommitmentsofTraders/ExplanatoryNotes/index.htm).

Article By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

10-Year Note Speculators raised bearish bets for 4th straight week

March 2nd – By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

10-Year Note Non-Commercial Speculator Positions:

Large bond speculators added to their bearish net positions in the 10-Year Note futures markets in February, according to the latest Commitment of Traders (COT) data released by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) on Friday.

This latest COT data is from the middle of February due to the government shutdown which suspended the releases for approximately a month. The CFTC is releasing data on Tuesdays and Fridays going forward until the data is back up to date.

The non-commercial futures contracts of 10-Year Note futures, traded by large speculators and hedge funds, totaled a net position of -215,091 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday February 19th. This was a weekly decline of -49,602 net contracts from the previous week which had a total of -165,489 net contracts.



Get our Weekly Commitment of Traders Report: – See where the biggest traders (Hedge Funds and Commercial Hedgers) are positioned in the futures markets on a weekly basis.


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The week’s net position was the result of the gross bullish position (longs) advancing by 8,766 contracts to a weekly total of 702,945 contracts compared to the gross bearish position (shorts) which saw a boost by 58,368 contracts for the week to a total of 918,036 contracts.

The speculative 10-year positioning saw greater bearish bets for the fourth week in a row and to the highest level in the previous seven weeks, according to the latest data. The overall net standing rose back over the -200,000 contract level for the first time since January 15th.

10-Year Note Commercial Positions:

The commercial traders position, hedgers or traders engaged in buying and selling for business purposes, totaled a net position of 191,580 contracts on the week. This was a weekly boost of 64,977 contracts from the total net of 126,603 contracts reported the previous week.

10-Year Note Futures:

Over the same weekly reporting time-frame, from Tuesday to Tuesday, the 10-Year Note Futures (Front Month) closed at approximately $122.51 which was an uptick of $0.28 from the previous close of $122.23, according to unofficial market data.

*COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) as well as the commercial traders (hedgers & traders for business purposes) were positioned in the futures markets.

The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators).

Find CFTC criteria here: (http://www.cftc.gov/MarketReports/CommitmentsofTraders/ExplanatoryNotes/index.htm).

Article By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

Gold Speculators pushed bullish bets to highest since April 2018 in mid-February

March 2nd – By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

Gold Non-Commercial Speculator Positions:

Large precious metals speculators lifted their bullish net positions in the Gold futures markets in February, according to the latest Commitment of Traders (COT) data released by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) on Friday.

This latest COT data is from the middle of February due to the government shutdown which suspended the releases for approximately a month. The CFTC is releasing data on Tuesdays and Fridays going forward until the data is back up to date.

The non-commercial futures contracts of Gold futures, traded by large speculators and hedge funds, totaled a net position of 145,647 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday February 19th. This was a weekly increase of 40,773 net contracts from the previous week which had a total of 104,874 net contracts.



Get our Weekly Commitment of Traders Report: – See where the biggest traders (Hedge Funds and Commercial Hedgers) are positioned in the futures markets on a weekly basis.


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The week’s net position was the result of the gross bullish position (longs) increasing by 39,916 contracts to a weekly total of 254,086 contracts compared to the gross bearish position (shorts) which saw a lowering by -857 contracts for the week to a total of 108,439 contracts.

The Gold speculative position rose for the third time in four weeks through the February 19th data and pushed the overall net position to the highest level since April 17th of 2018. Gold speculators have now had a bullish overall position for the past fourteen weeks going back to November 20th.

Gold Commercial Positions:

The commercial traders position, hedgers or traders engaged in buying and selling for business purposes, totaled a net position of -166,477 contracts on the week. This was a weekly drop of -40,366 contracts from the total net of -126,111 contracts reported the previous week.

Gold Futures:

Over the same weekly reporting time-frame, from Tuesday to Tuesday, the Gold Futures (Front Month) closed at approximately $1344.80 which was an uptick of $30.80 from the previous close of $1314.00, according to unofficial market data.

*COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) as well as the commercial traders (hedgers & traders for business purposes) were positioned in the futures markets.

The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators).

Find CFTC criteria here: (http://www.cftc.gov/MarketReports/CommitmentsofTraders/ExplanatoryNotes/index.htm).

Article By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

Bitcoin Speculators raised their bearish bets for 3rd week. Commercials go bullish

March 2nd – By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

Bitcoin Non-Commercial Speculator Positions:

Large cryptocurrency speculators increased their bearish net positions in the Bitcoin futures markets in mid-February, according to the latest Commitment of Traders (COT) data released by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) on Friday.

This latest COT data is from the middle of February due to the government shutdown which suspended the releases for approximately a month. The CFTC is releasing data on Tuesdays and Fridays going forward until the data is back up to date.

The non-commercial futures contracts of Bitcoin futures, traded by large speculators and hedge funds, totaled a net position of -1,439 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday February 19th. This was a weekly reduction of -210 net contracts from the previous week which had a total of -1,229 net contracts.



Get our Weekly Commitment of Traders Report: – See where the biggest traders (Hedge Funds and Commercial Hedgers) are positioned in the futures markets on a weekly basis.


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The week’s net position was the result of the gross bullish position (longs) lowering by -14 contracts to a weekly total of 1,508 contracts compared to the gross bearish position (shorts) which saw a gain by 196 contracts for the week to a total of 2,947 contracts.

The speculative Bitcoin positioning saw rising bearish bets for three straight weeks through February 19th and leveled at its most bearish standing since August 28th.


Bitcoin Commercial Positions:


The commercial traders position, hedgers or traders engaged in buying and selling for business purposes, totaled a net position of 106 contracts on the week. This was a weekly increase of 38 contracts from the total net of 68 contracts reported the previous week.

The commercials position rose higher into a bullish standing after spending their previous positionings in bearish territory. The commercial positions started getting included in the data in November after approximately a year of just speculative and small trader contracts being available.


Small Trader Positions:

The small traders position, a mix of hedgers and speculators that don’t meet the requirement for large traders, rose for a third week to a total of 1,333 net contracts. This was a weekly gain of 172 contracts from the previous week.

The small trader position was at the most bullish level since January 15th and have maintained a bullish position in Bitcoin futures since the beginning in December 2017.

Bitcoin Futures:

Over the same weekly reporting time-frame, from Tuesday to Tuesday, the Bitcoin Futures (Front Month) closed at approximately $3935 which was a rise of $330 from the previous close of $3605, according to unofficial market data.

*COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) as well as the commercial traders (hedgers & traders for business purposes) were positioned in the futures markets.

The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators).

Find CFTC criteria here: (http://www.cftc.gov/MarketReports/CommitmentsofTraders/ExplanatoryNotes/index.htm).

Article By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

S&P500 Mini Speculators continued to raise their bearish bets in mid-February

March 2nd – By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

S&P500 Mini Non-Commercial Speculator Positions:

Large stock market speculators once again increased their bearish net positions in the S&P500 Mini futures markets in February, according to the latest Commitment of Traders (COT) data released by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) on Friday.

This latest COT data is from the middle of February due to the government shutdown which suspended the releases for approximately a month. The CFTC is releasing data on Tuesdays and Fridays going forward until the data is back up to date.

The non-commercial futures contracts of S&P500 Mini futures, traded by large speculators and hedge funds, totaled a net position of -130,834 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday February 19th. This was a weekly lowering of -11,329 net contracts from the previous week which had a total of -119,505 net contracts.



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The week’s net position was the result of the gross bullish position (longs) lowering by -8,203 contracts to a weekly total of 322,912 contracts compared to the gross bearish position (shorts) which saw a gain by 3,126 contracts for the week to a total of 453,746 contracts.

The SP500-Mini speculator positions pushed further into bearish territory to the lowest level since December 6th of 2016 through February 19th. Overall, the spec net position decreased for nine straight weeks through the latest data and has now been in bearish territory for five straight weeks.

S&P500 Mini Commercial Positions:

The commercial traders position, hedgers or traders engaged in buying and selling for business purposes, totaled a net position of 25,967 contracts on the week. This was a weekly gain of 3,552 contracts from the total net of 22,415 contracts reported the previous week.

S&P500 Mini Futures:

Over the same weekly reporting time-frame, from Tuesday to Tuesday, the S&P500 Mini Futures (Front Month) closed at approximately $2778.75 which was an uptick of $34.00 from the previous close of $2744.75, according to unofficial market data.

*COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) as well as the commercial traders (hedgers & traders for business purposes) were positioned in the futures markets.

The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators).

Find CFTC criteria here: (http://www.cftc.gov/MarketReports/CommitmentsofTraders/ExplanatoryNotes/index.htm).

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Silver Speculators trimmed bullish bets off of highest level since Nov. 2017 for 2nd week

March 2nd – By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email

Silver Non-Commercial Speculator Positions:

Large precious metals speculators cut back on their bullish net positions in the Silver futures markets for a second week through mid-February, according to the latest Commitment of Traders (COT) data released by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) on Friday.

This latest COT data is from the middle of February due to the government shutdown which suspended the releases for approximately a month. The CFTC is releasing data on Tuesdays and Fridays going forward until the data is back up to date.

The non-commercial futures contracts of Silver futures, traded by large speculators and hedge funds, totaled a net position of 50,269 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday February 19th. This was a weekly reduction of -2,934 net contracts from the previous week which had a total of 53,203 net contracts.



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The week’s net position was the result of the gross bullish position (longs) decreasing by -587 contracts to a weekly total of 89,135 contracts compared to the gross bearish position (shorts) which saw a advance by 2,347 contracts for the week to a total of 38,866 contracts.

The Silver speculator positions declined modestly for two straight weeks through February 19th after a two-week rise had brought bullish bets to the highest level since November of 2017. The spec position had been in extreme bearish territory as recently as November 27th of 2018 before the spec positions rose sharply for eight out of the next ten weeks through early February, bringing the net positions roaring back into a bullish standing.

Silver Commercial Positions:

The commercial traders position, hedgers or traders engaged in buying and selling for business purposes, totaled a net position of -73,874 contracts on the week. This was a weekly increase of 1,620 contracts from the total net of -75,494 contracts reported the previous week.

Silver Futures:

Over the same weekly reporting time-frame, from Tuesday to Tuesday, the Silver Futures (Front Month) closed at approximately $1596.70 which was an advance of $27.70 from the previous close of $1569.00, according to unofficial market data.

*COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) as well as the commercial traders (hedgers & traders for business purposes) were positioned in the futures markets.

The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators).

Find CFTC criteria here: (http://www.cftc.gov/MarketReports/CommitmentsofTraders/ExplanatoryNotes/index.htm).

Article By CountingPips.comReceive our weekly COT Reports by Email